Eleaml


Great Britain: Paper Correspondence Despatch relating to the Southern of Italy

PAPERS RELATING TO THE TREATMENT

OF POLITICAL PRISONERS AT NAPLES

AND THE ARREST OF MR. BISHOP

____________________________________________________________

Presented to the House of Commons by Command of Her Majesty.

1862.

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LONDON:

PRINTED DY HARRISON AND SONS.

LIST OF PAPERS.

(se vuoi, scarica il testo in formato ODT o PDF)
No.Page
1. Sir J. Hudson to Earl RussellApril718621
Two Inclosures.
2. Consul Bonham to Earl RussellApril10---2
3. Sir J. Hudson to Earl RussellApril11.---2
One Inclosure.---
4. Earl Russell to Sir J. HudsonApril15---3
5. The Rev. A. Bishop to Earl RussellApril17---3
One Inclosure.
6. The Rev. A. Bishop to Mr. HammondApril17---6
7. Mr. Hammond to the Rev. A. BishopApril19---6
8. Earl Russell to Sii* J. Hudson April21---6
9. Mr. Hammond to the Rev. A. BishopApril21---6
10. Sir J. Hudson to Earl RussellApril18---6
11. Sir J. Hudson to Mr. Hammond April19---7
12. Sir J. Hudson to Earl RussellApril20---7
One Inclosure.
13. Consul Bonham to Earl Russell April22---7
Three Inclosures.
14. Mr. Hammond to the Rev. A. BishopApril30---
15. Earl Russell to Consul BonhamMay7---9
16. Earl Russell to Sir J. Hudson. May7---9
17. Consul Bonham to Earl RussellMay1---9
One Inclosure.
18. Mr. Hammond to the Rev. A. BishopMay14---10
19. Earl Russell to Consul-General BonhamMay15---10
20. Mr. Hammond to the Rev. A. BishopMay16---11
21. The Rev. A. Bishop to Mr. HammondMay27---11
22. Consul Bonham to Earl Russell May22---11
One Inclosure.
23. Sir J. Hudson to Earl Russell ».May27---13
24. Mr. Hammond to the Rev. A. BishopJune3---13
25. Earl Russell to Sir J. HudsonJune9---13
26. Consul-General Bonham to Earl RussellJune7---13
27. Sir J. Hudson to Earl RussellJune14---14
One Inclosure.
28. Sir J. Hudson to Earl RussellJune21---14
One Inclosure.
29. Earl Russell to Consul-General BonhamJune26---15
One Inclosure.
30. Earl Russell to Sir J. Hudson. July1---15
31. Consul-General Bonham to Earl RussellJune25---16
32. Consul-General Bonham to Earl RussellJune30---16
33. Sir J. Hudson to Earl RussellJuly4---17
One Inclosure.
34. Sir J. Hudson to Earl RussellJuly4---17
35. Consul-General Bonham to Earl RussellJuly3---18
One Inclosure.
36. Consul-General Bonham to Earl RussellJuly5---19
37. Consul-General Bonham to Earl RussellJuly9---20
One Inclosure.
38. Sir J. Hudson to Earl RussellJuly15---21
39. Consul-General Bonham to Earl RussellJuly19---21
Two Inclosures.
40. Sir J. Hudson to Earl RussellJuly30---23
41. Sir J. Hudson to Earl RussellJuly30---23
Two Inclosures.
Papers relating to the Treatment of Political Prisoners

at Naples, and the Arrest of Mr. Bishop.

No. 1.

Sir J. Hudson to Earl Russell.—(Received April 10.)

My Lord,                                Turin, April 7, 1862.

I HAVE the honour to inclose copy of a despatch from Her Majesty’s Consul at Naples, reporting the detention of an Englishman named Bishop, at Mola di Gaeta, suspected of being the bearer of treasonable correspondence between Naples and Rome. I likewise inclose copy of a letter which I have addressed to Mr. Bonham on this subject.

I have, &c.

(Signed) JAMES HUDSON.

________________

Inclosure 1 in No. 1.

Consul Bonham to Sir J. Hudson.

Sir,                                    Naples, April 4, 1862.

I HAVE the honour to report to you that, on the evening of the 2nd instant, when out walking, I met the Secretary of the Questor of Police, who told me that an Englishman named Bishop had been stopped by the police authorities at Mola di Gaeta, when on his way to Rome, owing to his passport not being in order; that this individual had been here for a long time under the surveillance of the police, and was suspected of being the bearer of treasonable correspondence between this city and Rome; that the Sub-Prefect at Mola had told him that if he would consent to his papers being examined, and that no correspondence of that description was found, he would pass over the irregularity in his passport, and that he might proceed at once; if not, he would be detained till instructions arrived from Naples. He would not consent to his papers being looked at, and had been accordingly detained. The Secretary added that he had been to my house to mention this to me, and to ask my consent tohis papers being searched. I told him I could give no such consent; that he best knew what grounds of suspicion he had; and that whatever • steps he took must be on his own responsibility. That the man being an Englishman was not on that account exempt from the operation of the laws, but that he must be careful not to go beyond what the laws warranted; and so we parted.

Yesterday, April l, at about 1 p.m., I received a telegram from Mr. Bishop, copy of which I inclose. I called immediately on his Excellency General la Marmora, showed him this despatch, and asked for some explanation. His Excellency informed me that Bishop was the bearer of treasonable and criminal correspondence to Rome, which had been discovered; that he was to be sent immediately up to Naples, where he expected him in the course of the afternoon; and that as soon as he could he would send the Questor to me to give me full explanations. The Secretary called at the Consulate in the evening, but I did not see him, and accordingly I sent Mr. Vice-Consul Turner to the Questura this morning to inquire. He returned with the Secretary, who showed me the telegram which had passed between the Questor and the Sub-Prefect at Mola di Gaeta. The latter stated the fact of treasonable correspondence having been discovered, and that Bishop would be sent up to Naples this day. As soon as he comes I shall know more of it. I mention the above facts with the view of receiving any instructions you may think it right to give me.

I must further mention that this Mr. Bishop has been some years in the country; he is of a respectable family. His father is, I believe, a clergyman in England, and, as far as I remember, wrote on one or more occasions to Mr. Elliot, then Her Majesty’s Envoy at Naples, to invoke his protection for his son, who had got into difficulties in Calabria. I have seen him at the Consulate once or twice about two years ago, owing to disputes with a tailor about money matters; otherwise I know nothing of him. I have frequently heard that he was mixed up in Bourbonist intrigues.

I have, &c.

(Signed) EDW. WALTER BONHAM.

________________

Inclosure 2 in No. 1.

Sir J. Hudson to Consul Bonham.

Sir,                                                 Turin, April 7, 1862.

I HAVE the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 4th instant, reporting the detention of Mr. Bishop at Mola di Gaeta; and I have to instruct you to watch carefully the progress of the proceedings taken against him, and to report to me accordingly.

I am, &c.

(Signed) JAMES HUDSON.

No. 2.

Consul Bonham to Earl Russell.—(Received April 20.)

(Extract.)                                        Naples, April 10, 1862.

I HAVE the honour to report to your Lordship that an Englishman named Bishop has been arrested at Mola di Gaeta, brought to Naples, and here committed to prison on the charge of being engaged in conspiracy against this Government. A copy of the verbal in his case, sent to me by the Questor of Police, I have forwarded to Her Majesty’s Envoy at Turin, to whom 1 have also reported the circumstances in detail.

No. 3.

Sir J. Hudson to Earl Russell.—(Received April 14.)

My Lord,                                                  Turin, April 11, 1862.

WITH reference to my despatch of the 7th instant, I have the honour to inclose herewith to your Lordship the copy of a second letter from Her Majesty’s Consul at Naples respecting the arrest of Mr. James Bishop.

I have, &c.

(Signed) JAMES HUDSON.

__________________________

Inclosure in No. 3.

Consul Bonham to Sir J. Hudson.

Sir,Naples, April 5, 1862.

I HAVE the honour to report to you that the Secretary of the Questura of Police called on me this morning, and showed me the containing copies of some of the letters found in possession of Mr. James Bishop, whose arrest at Mola di Gaeta I reported to you in my despatch yesterday; this procès-verbal, each page of which was signed by the said James Bishop and others, unquestionably, in my opinion, establishing his complicity in a conspiracy against this Government. I am promised a copy of this document, which I will send to you.

The Secretary further stated that the procès-verbal would be sent in at once to the Procuratore-Generale, and he had no doubt an order would be given for Bishop to be committed to prison to stand his trial for the offence. Against this I did not see that I had any grounds to protest.

Mr. Bishop was brought in from Mola di Gaeta yesterday under a guard. Since his arrival he had been lodged in the Questor’s room, and treated with courtesy. I sent Mr. Vice-Consul Turner to see him this morning. He acknowledged this, and added that the Questor was a gentleman, and treated him with every consideration, but complained that he had been taunted and ill-treated at Mola di Gaeta; two policemen were constantly in his room, night and day; that he was abused as a German calling himself an Englishman; struck under the chin and challenged to tight by the Chief Delegate of Police, whom, however, he acknowledged he had called abusive names.

As regarded the papers found, lie said, ‘‘I must bear the blame; I shall say nothing about them.” He demanded protection.

The Questor informed the Vice-Consul that he had written to Mola di Gaeta to have this complaint of ill-treatment investigated.

I hope on Monday next to be able to send you copy of the

I have, &c.

(Signed) EDW. WALTER BONHAM

No. 4.

Earl Russell to Sir J. Hudson.

Sir,                                            Foreign, April 15, 1862..

I HAVE received your despatches of the 7th and llth instant, relative to the arrest of Mr. Bishop at Mola di Gaeta, and I have to direct you to urge upon the Italian Government that he should at once be put on bis trial for the offence with which he is charged..'

I am, &c.

(Signed) RUSSELL

No. 5.

The Rev. A. Bishop to Earl Russell.—(Received April 18.)

(Extract.)Martyr W Rectory,, April 17, 1862.

I HAVE the honour to inclose a copy of my son’s letter, which I find on my return home this morning.

_________________

Inclosure in No. 5.

Statement by Mr. J. Bishop.

Naples, April 11, 1862

I LEFT Naples at 4 o’clock in the morning of the 2nd instant, intending to go to Rome, and occupied the seat which is vacant for one passenger in the courier which conveys the letters par terre, traversing the route of Capua, Gaeta, and Terracina. At Gaeta I was asked for my passport; gave it, and received it back again without any remark being made. We continued our way till the carriage carne to the Delegation, when it was stopped by four policemen, and I was forced out of the carriage, as they pretended, to speak to the “Delegate.” On going up stairs, I found myself in a room occupied by a number of the police, and two young men who called themselves “Delegati.” These were the same who had asked for my passport but a few moments before. I asked what they wanted, and what their motive could be in acting with such suspicion and roughness. The only answer

I received was an order given to the police, who stood surrounding me, to search me and my luggage. I remonstrated, and showed my passport, which had the risa of the British Consul at Naples, and that of the Roman Consul. I was answered by a coarse laugh, and told to hold my tongue, for that “I was a Swiss in disguise, and no British subject at all and that they, the two Delegati, “would teach the Government how to deal with all such Reactionists.”

The order was given to the police to search me. My things lay already strewn about the floor, where they were loft. Nothing was found among them. They then proceeded to search my person, stripping me to my shirt, and forcing me to take off even my shoes and stockings. This lasted some time, as I refused to submit, and was held by four policemen, while the rest stripped me of my clothes. Great violence was used, and I was left completely exhausted, being in a very weak state of health, and told in the most insulting way to dress myself. I expostulated, threatened, asked, but all to no purpose, except to bring on me a torrent of abuse and bad language. Nothing had been found apparently to satisfy them, and there only remained my writing-desk, of which they had not found the key. They threatened to break it open, if of my own accord I did not open it. I refused to do so, declaring that I preferred returning to Naples, or sending a telegraphic despatch to the “Questura” and my Consul, who would be able to satisfy them. They refused to listen, declaring that they were the authorities of the place, and as for my Consul, I had none, for the Swiss were no longer tolerated in the' kingdom, and I was one of the last to be sent away. The courier then appeared, saying that he could not possibly wait any longer, and that if I were not ready to go on, he must leave me behind. The two authorities answered for me that 1 was detained by them, and could not continue my journey. I asked why? and was told that I had come with a false passport, and should be taken back to Naples. I protested, but in vain. The room was full of police who prevented me from stirring hand or foot, for I was surrounded by them.

The courier was a Piedmontese, and said to me in German, “But you speak German; I don’t believe you can be an Englishman, for I heard you talking German to your friend who accompanied you to the door of the carriage at Naples.” He then turned to the “Delegati,” assuring them that I was either an Austrian or a Swiss. The paper was then given hi in allowing him to go on without me.

I have since heard that this man had suspected me from a remark my friend had made to me before starting; and as soon as we arrived at Capua he sent a telegram to Gaeta warning the police to have me searched. This man was a Garibaldist, and is called Matteo. As soon as he left 1 was again attacked to make me open my desk. Having many letters which had been given me by friends to take to Rome, I  persisted in refusing to give the key. which they had not been able to find. I was called the most obscene names by the two authorities, one of whom declared he would see whether I was an Englishman, and challenged me to fight him. I began to doubt whether I was ready in the hands of the authorities, and feared to have fallen into the hands of thieves dressed in the uniform of the police, as this is a means employed almost daily in the provinces. But the Sardinian flag and cross removed my doubts, and just then the Under-Prefect entered the room; a cabal ensued, in which I could not make myself heard, and all I could perceive was that the Prefect laughed a good deal, and then left the room.

The fellow who had challenged me then carne up, and, haranguing me after the manner of a savage Chief, told me that “I had given the last proof of not being an Englishman by not accepting his challenge; that I was a vile Royalist, he was sure of it, and he would teach my entrails to respect Italia, and to know the worth of the precious blood of Garibaldists, such as his.” My answer brought sudi a blow from his fist on my chest, that I reeled back and fell over the chair which stood behind.

Another man poked his fist under my chin, telling me it was all right, I should soon be done for.

Some time elapsed; they then agreed to telegraph to Naples, and, after an hour, pretending that the answer had come giving them “plein pouvoir,” they called in some ten men of the National Guard, the Mayor and Judge of the place, and ordered the police to search me again. I was then literally stripped to the skin, and again left to dress myself. The key of my desk was found, and, amid the most coarse and obscene language, they began to search through the papers it contained.

There were three letters given me to deliver to friends of some of my acquaintances in Naples,in which reference was made to the efforts they were making for the return of the King. In another was a detailed list of the forces throughout the kingdom, which were armed and in readiness to begin the general movement as soon as the King should approve. These forces amounted to 80,000 men. The rest of the papers were private letters, the greater part of which were from my mother. These were handed over with the rest, and, because no one present understood English, two Piedmontese officers were sent for from the town to see what these letters contained. After perusing them for some time, both declared they were not written in English, “but in what language they could not exactly tell and the younger of the two turned to question me.

A savage yell burst from the crowd surrounding the table on which lay strewn my desk and papers, and 1 saw the “Delegato ” holding up a photograph of my mother in one hand, and a portrait of the King in the other, on the back of which was his signature. I tried to obtain them, driven, as I was, almost to madness by the ill-treatment I had received, but was held back by the policemen and my arms pinioned while the operation continued. The portrait of the King was then thrown, with that of my mother, on to the ground. Some pretended to tread on them, and the Delegato spoke out a sort of form, implying that the King and all who followed him were the most infamous of creatures, to which the whole company shouted “Amen!” and “Viva Garibaldi!”

I was then taken, guarded by ten policemen, to the inn, where I was locked into a bedroom, two policemen being left with me during the night.

It was 10 o’clock p.m. when I reached the inn. I had not tasted food the whole day, and was almost fainting from exhaustion and the brutal treatment I had had to endure during the eleven hours I was detained at the Delegation. The master of the inn, who knows me well, brought me some supper, and I went to bed, the policemen sitting beside me.

I was not allowed to stir from my room the whole of the following day, being told that I must hold myself in readiness to go to Naples.

At 4 o’clock p.m. they allowed me to telegraph to my Consul at Naples, for the first time, begging his interference. I received no answer to this despatch.

I was treated in the most shameful manner during the whole of this day by the police, who never left me, and was constantly assured of what the Piedmontese officer had menaced me with in their presence the preceding evening—that I deserved to be hung, and that this would probably be my fate. I did not feel that my life was safe an instant, and, if I had not been so strictly guarded, I should have jumped out of the window and il ed for safety.

On Friday morning, the 4th, I was forced to dress myself in a few minutes, and to hurry away without being allowed to touch a morsel of any food whatever.

In the carriage were the two Delegati, two policemen, and myself. There were four loaded guns, and three revolvers. The carriage was accompanied by two mounted Carabineers. It was in this way that I was escorted back to Capua. I was there placed in a railway-carriage, and arrived at Naples at 6 o'clock in the evening, having been again obliged to pass a whole day without touching food.

I attempted to drive to my Consul, but was surrounded by two or three men dressed in plain clothes, whom I had not perceived before, one of whom said, “In the mime of the Questore,” &c., and I was half handed, half forced, into the carriage, into which the unknown speaker followed.

Arrived at the Questura, I am bound to own that I was shown every attention possible; the Questor giving me his office to lie down in, and sending for some refreshment for me.

I requested to go to my Consul’s, but was refused. At the same time the SecretaryGeneral went there himself, to inform the Consul of my arrival, and of my wish to see him.

The Secretary returned alone, saying that the British Consul had not found it necessary to come himself, and as regarded the papers which should be opened by the Questor, he (the Consul) had said that the law was to have its course.

Accordingly, witnesses being called in, and the Questor having allowed me to name whoever I pleased for myself, the packet of papers taken from my desk was opened, the papers read, signed, and a proces-verbal-made of their contents.

In this manner the night of Friday was spent. I was cross-examined, and refused to enlighten them upon what did not concern myself; nevertheless, numbers of arrestations were made that night from mere suspicion; others from their names having been found written in my hook of addresses, and amongst these latter, that of an old doctor who had been recommended to me three years ago, when I was ill, but with whom I had certainly had nothing to do in politics, for I had never seen him since. This pool old man is now in the same prison with myself.

The following morning, Saturday, Mr. Turner, the Vice-Consul, carne to me, heard my complaint, assured me that the Consul would protect me, as well as any other British subject, and then left me. I have never seen the Consul at all, and the Vice-Consul only once.

I remained at the Questura during Saturday and Sunday, and am bound to bear testimony to the great kindness and consideration shown me by all the officials, and the regret expressed by the Questor to be obliged to act against me. I was also informed. that the British Consul had been asked if he wished me to be placed in conditional liberty, ha answering for me; that, in this case, the Questor would have no hesitation in doing so. The Consul answered, that he could not take my part, and that the law must have its course. Accordingly, on Monday morning, at 7 o’clock, I was conveyed from the Questura to the prison of Santa Maria Apparente; there, with all due respect, I was placed in my cell, my hat being taken from me, and my things visited. I have not yet seen my Consul, and have no idea of what steps are being taken, or if any at all, either to hasten on my trial or procure my liberation; but as the Count de Christen is in the same prison, where he has been detained nine months without his being brought to trial, I have not much better to hope for.

The injustice of the whole proceeding is apparent; the ill-treatment I have received monstrous. All proof against me is reduced to this: that I carried correspondence upon me which, if authentic, tended to subvert the present Government at Naples. For letters written by others, and given to me sealed up, I am not answerable; there are no proofs whatever that I had taken any part of what Comes under the name of a conspiracy, for I am alone, and have no associates: at the same time, I am treated as a condemned criminal. I have, for the fìrst three nights, been obliged to sleep on the stone floor of my celi, till I had arranged to have the necessary furniture of a bed and chairs sent me from the town. The situation of the prison is healthy, and I must own that the officials do not appear to do their duty with unnecessary rigour; they are respectful and well conducted. My health is already beginning to suffer from the confinement, and would eventually, I feel sure, break quite down, if I had to endure this life long.

I am writing this in the night, as I should not be allowed to send what had not already been seen, either by the Delegato here or the Questor at Naples.

(Signed) JAMES F. BISHOP.

No. 6.

The Rev. A. Bishop to Mr. Hammond.—(Received April 18.)

Sir,                      Martyr Worthy Winchester, April 17, 1861.

I TARE the liberty of saying that Lord Russell was so kind as to inform me on Wednesday evening that he would make representations at the Horse Guards which (his Lordship thought) would induce the authorities there to permit my son, Lieutenant Henry Bishop, to go to Naples on his brother’s behalf. My son is on the point of exchanging from the 89th to the 22nd (1st battalion), which latter is now at Malta; and as soon as he receives this formal permission he will set out.

May I ask the favour of your bringing it under his Lordship’s notice if it has escaped his mind?

I am. &c.

(Signed) ALFRED BISHOP.

No. 7.

Mr. Hammond to the Rev. A. Bishop.

Sir,                                 Foreign Office, April 19, 1862.

I AM directed by Earl Russell to state to you, in reply to your letter of yesterday, that His Royal Highness the Commander-in-chief has consented to send leave for Lieutenant Bishop.

I am, &c.

(Signed) E. HAMMOND.

No. 8.

Earl Russell to Sir J. Hudson.

Sir,                                                       Foreign Office, April 21, 1862.

I HAVE already instructed you, by my despatch of the 15th instant, to request the Italian Government to proceed as soon as possible with the trial of Mr. Bishop, who was arrested at Mola di Gaeta on a charge of carrying treasonable correspondence.

I have now further to instruct vou to state to the Italian Government that Her Majesty’s Government trust that if the trial should result in his conviction of the offence laid to his charge, his lite will, at all events, be spared; and that the punishment awarded to him will be limited to banishment, instead of imprisonment, which, from what has been reported to me of the general state of his health, might end very shortly in death.

I am, &c.

(Signed) RUSSELL.

No. 9.

Mr. Hammond to the Rev. A. Bishop.

Sir,                                  Foreign Office, April 21, 1862.

I AM directed by Earl Russell to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 17th instant, forwarding a copy of a statement by your son, Mr. James Bishop, of the circumstances attending his arrest at Mola di Gaeta, and his subsequent imprisonment at Naples.

I am, &c.

(Signed) E. HAMMOND.

No. 10.

Sir J. Hudson to Earl Russell.—(Received April 23.)

My Lord,                                    Turin, April 18, 1862.

I HAVE the honour to inform your Lordship that I this morning communicated to Signor Ratazzi the desire of your Lordship that Mr. Bishop, recently arrested at Mola di Gaeta, should be put upon his trial at once for the offence with which he is charged.

Signor Ratazzi said that no unnecessary delay should be interposed, but he feared that Mr. Bishop could not be brought to trial before the sessione in the first week of May.

I have, &c.

(Signed) JAMES HUDSON.

No. 11.

Sir J. Hudson lo Mr. Hammond.—(Received April 23.)

(Extract.)                               Turin, April 19, 1862.

I HAVE spoken to Rattazzi, as you and Earl Russell desire, about bringing Bishop without unnecessary delay to trial. He says everything shall be done that can be done to avoid unnecessary delay; but that it is unfortunate that Bishop should have been caught just at the moment that the entire criminal process in the Neapolitan States should be undergoing revision and radical change, t. e., from secret to open process, jury, assizes, &o. But he hopes that by the first week in May he may be put upon bis trial.

No. 12.

Sir J. Hudson to Earl Russell.—(Received April 23.)

(Extract.)                        Turin, April 20, 1862.

WITH reference to my despatch of the 18th instant, respecting the case against Mr. Bishop, 1 have the honour to transmit herewith to your Lordship the copy of a farther despatch which I have received from Mr. Bonham with reference to the progress of the proccedings against the individual in question.

___________________________

Inclosure in No. 12.

Consul Bonham to Sir J. Hudson.

Sir,                                            Naples, April 17, 1862.

I HAVE the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch of the 7th April, instructing me to watch the progress of proceedings taken against Mr. Bishop, and to report to you.

I received a note from that individual, some days ago, complaining of the treatment he had received when arrested at Mola di Gaeta, and requesting to see me. Being unable to go myself, Mr. Vice-Consul Turner called at the Prison of Santa Maria Apparente, where Mr. Bishop is confined, and saw him. As a prisoner he is well lodged and treated, and does not complain of the treatment, but desired to be set at liberty, provisionally, on depositing security, until his trial carne on, and also tbat the trial should be had as soon as possible.

As to the first point, I have consulted a lawyer, and am informed such a course is contrary to law, and impossible; so have made no application to the Government on the subject.

As to urging forward the period of trial, I will lose no opportunity of pressing this. I have seen Signor Trombetta, who has, however, unfortunately, just resigned the post of Procuratore-Generale. He tells me the Courts are now in vacation, and an entire new System will commence when they re-assemble at the beginning of May. The affair is in the hands of a Juge d’Instruction, and I will do all that depends on me to obviate unnecessary and vexatious delay, such as has occurred in the case of Count Cristen.

A gentleman residing here, who has some acquaintance with Mr. Bishop’s family, is interesting himself in finding him a good Advocate to conduct his defence.

I have &c.

(Signed) EDW. WALTER BONHAM.

No. 13.

Consul Bonham to Earl Russell.—-(Received April 28.)

(Extract.)                                          April 22, 1862.

WITH reference to your Lordship’s telegram, received this day, I have the honour to state that the case of Mr. Bishop has not been neglected by me. I  inclose copies of the reports I have sent on this subject to Sir James Hudson.

Mr. Bishop is in the Prison of Santa Maria Apparente, but as well treated and as comfortable as a person in those circumstances can be. Vice-Consul Turner has seen him twice since he has been there, and once before he was committed. He makes no complaint of the treatment, but complains that he is not admitted to bail. I have inquired from two lawyers, and also from M. Trombetta (still nominally Procuratore-Generale) on this point; they informed me that such liberation is impossible, and, as it has not been granted in the case of Count de Cristen, I believe it to be so. However, Mr. Bishop now States that a Count Camaldoli was, some time ago, liberated, so that there is a precedent.

I have spoken to M. Visone, Acting Prefect in Civil Affairs, on this point. He tells me he believes Mr. Bishop is mistaken, bnt recommended that he should draw up a formal demand to the Court to be liberated on bail.

1 have communicated this to Mr. Bishop, and as soon as I receive his application will forward it to the Judges of the Criminal Court, and the point will be decided; even if granted, however, unless some of those whose safety may be compromised by revelations, which it may be in Mr. Bishop’s power to make, come forward with security, 1 do not see how it can profit him.

I lose no opportunity of pressing for an early trial, but till the Courts meet again can get no possible intimation as to when this may be.

Unfortunately, at present, at least, Mr. Bishop declines the assistance of an Advocate, believing that Her Majesty’s Government will see to his release.

___________________

Inclosure I in No. 13.

Consul Bonham to Sir J. Hudson, April 4, 1862.

[See Inclosure 1 in No. 1.]

___________________

Inclosure 2 in No. 13.

Consul Bonham to Sir J. Hudson, April 5, 1862.

[See Inclosure in No. 3.]

___________________

Inclosure 3 in No. 13.

Consul Bonham to Sir J. Hudson, April 17, 1862.

[See Inclosure in No. 12.

No. 14.

Mr. Hammond to the Rev. A. Bishop.

Sir,                                    Foreign Office, April 30, 1862.

WITH reference to your letter of the 17th instant, inclosing a copy of your son’s statement of the circumstances attending his arrest at Mola di Gaeta, and his subsequent imprisonment at Naples, I am directed by Earl Russell to inform you that a report, dated the 22nd instant, has been received from Her Majesty’s Consul at Naples, denying that he has neglected Mr. Bishop, who is confined in the prison of Santa Maria Apparente, but who is as well treated and as comfortable as is possible under the circumstances. The British Vice-Consul has seen him altogether three times, and the Consul says that Mr. Bishop has complained of nothing but that he is not admitted to bail. Legal  ad vice has been taken on this point, and the Consul has been informed that such a proceeding was out of the question. As, however, Mr. Bishop has cited a precedent, he has been advised to make a formal  application on the subject to the proper authorities, which the Consul would forward to the Judges, but apparently without much hope of success.

I ani to add, that the Consul loses no opportunity of pressing for an early trial, but he expresses his regret that Mr. Bishop should decline the assistance of an Advocate, en the ground that he relies on Her Majesty’s Government to obtain his release.

I am, &c.

(Signed) E. HAMMOND.

No. 15.

Earl Russell to Consul Bonham.

Sir,                                  Foreign Office, May-7, 1862.

I HAVE received your despatch of the 22nd ultimo, reporting your proceedings with regard to Mr. Bishop, imprisoned at Naples on a charge of carrying treasonable correspondence; and I have to inform you in reply that Her Majesty’s Government approve your conduct in that matter.

I am, &c.

(Signed) RUSSELL.

No. 16.

Earl Russell to Sir J. Hudson.

Sir,                                           Foreign Office, May 7, 1862.

HER Majesty’s Government are glad to find, from Mr. Bonham’s despatch of the 30th of April, that brigandage is diminishing in the Neapolitan provinces; and they trust that this favourable change in the state of affairs will operate to save the life of Mr. Bishop, who is little more than a foolish meddler and instrument in the hands of designing persons, and of Count Cristen, who has been for so many months awaiting his trial.

The Government of King Victor Emmanuel may be assured that the opinion of Europe will be conciliated by clemency shown to persons accused of political crimes.

I am, &c.

(Signed) RUSSELL.

No. 17.

Consul Bonham to Earl Russell.—(Received May 10.)

My Lord,                                             Naples, May 1, 1862.

WITH reference to my despatch of the 22nd April, relative to the case of Mr. James Bishop, I have the honour to inclose copy and translation of the reply I have received from the Prefect to the application I forwarded to him from Mr. Bishop, requesting to be admitted to bail. The Judges of the Criminal Court, to whom this matter was referred, have refused his application, at all events for the present. Mr. Henry Bishop has arrived here, and is daily in communication with his brother; he confirmed what I had previously repòrted to your Lordship, that Mr. James Bishop is very well treated, and, for his position, comfortable, but States that his health suffers from confinement, and Wishes me officially to demand his liberation, which I have declined to do, for I really cannot see that I am justified in doing so. I shall continue to urge that as short a time as possible may be allowed to elapse before Mr. Bishop is brought to trial, so as to abridge, as far as may be, the period of his confinement. Mr. James Bishop still declines the assistance of an advocate.

I have, &c.

(Signed) EDW. WALTER BONHAM.

____________________

Inclosure in No. 17.

Signor Visone to Consul Bonham.

Napoli, 30 Aprile, 1862.

IL Signor Procuratore-Generale presso la Gran Corte Criminale di Napoli, al quale mi feci carico di trasmettere la domanda del Signor Bishop intesa ad ottenere la libertà provvisoria mediante cauzione e dalla S.V. Illustrissima raccomandatami, mi riscontra trasmettendomi copia della decisione al riguardo emessa dalla Gran Corte, colla quale si pronuncia non poter essere accolta per ora la domanda del Bishop, salvo a potersene fare più opportunamente oggetto di deliberazione quando gli atti della istruzione avranno fornito i necessari elementi alla discussione.

Non credo intanto inopportuno di significare alla S.V. Illustrissima che i carichi onde il Bishop è per ora gravato il chiariscono complicato in una odiosa cospirazione della quale si era egli fatto l’organo e lo strumento a controsenso dei benevoli sentimenti di simpatia che professa per l’Italia la nobile nazione cui egli appartiene. La istruzione del processo procederà per fermo con la massima celerità, essendosi anche dietro li da me fatti uffici già dati gli opportuni ordini.

Spiacente come sono di non poter per ora dare alla S.V. Illustrissima un riscontro più soddisfacente al  suoi desideri, mi valgo, &c.

Per Il Prefetto,

(Firmato) VISONE.

(Translation.)

April 30, 1862.

THE Procurator-General of the Grand Criminal Court at Naples, to whom I took care to transmit the request of Mr. Bishop, applying for liberation on bail, as recommended to me by you, has answered by handing me a copy of the decision of the Grand Court in this affair, in which it declares that the request of Bishop cannot at present be complied with; but that it can be made, more opportunely, a subject for dcliberation when the documents of the procès shall have fumished the necessary elements for a discussion.

I do not, however, consider it inopportune to intimate to you that the charges under which Bishop is at present detained clearly point him out as compromised in an odious conspiracy, of which he has made himself the organ and tool, in direct opposition to the benevolent sentiments of sympathy which the noble nation to which he belongs professes for Italy. The instruction of the process will certainly be carried on with the utmost celerity, the necessary orders having already been given in accordance with my directions.

Displeased as I am to be unable to give you a more satisfactory reply, I profit, &c.

For the Prefetto,

(Signed) VISONE.

No. 18.

Mr. Hammond to the Rev. A. Bishop.

Sir,                                                  Office, May 14, 1862

I AM directed by Earl Russell to inform you that a further report has been received from Her Majesty’s Consul at Naples, from which it appears that your son’s application to be liberated on bail has been, for the present at any rate, rejected.

Mr. Henry Bishop had arrived, and was in Constant communication with his brother; and the Consul observes, that he, Mr. Henry Bishop, confirms the statement that his brother is well, and even comfortably, treated: his health, however, is reported to have suffered from the confinement to which he is subjected, but the Consul is unable to do more on his behalf than to urge that no delay may take place in bringing him to trial.

The Consul adds, that Mr. Bishop still declines the assistance of an Advocate.

I am, &c.

(Signed) E. HAMMOND.

No. 19.

Earl Russell to Consul-General Bonham.

Sir,                                                 Foreign, May 15, 1862.

HER Majesty’s Government approve your conduct in the case of Mr. James Bishop, as report ed in your despatch of the 1st instant.

I am, &c.

(Signed) RUSSELL.

No. 20.

Mr. Hammond  to the Rev. A. Bishop.

Dear Sir,                                       Foreign Office, May 16, 1862.

I HAVE laid before Lord Russell your letter, and its inclosure of the 10th of May, and I am desired to acquaint you, in reply, that the conduct of Mr. Consul-General Bonham, in regard to your son Mr. Henry Bishop, has been entirely approved.

As regards the extent to which Sir James Hudson will be authorized to interfere iti behalf of your son, I can onlv say that he will doubtless, in conformity with the instructions that he has received, do what he properly can, in addition to interposing for the sparing of his life, to induce the Italian Government to take as lenient a view of the crime of which he may be proved to be guilty, as the circumstances of the case will admit of.

I am, &c.

(Signed) E. HAMMOND.

__________________

No. 21.

The Rev. A. Bishop to Mr. Hammond.—(Received May 28.)

My dear Sir,     Martyr Worthy Rectory, Winchester, May 27, 1862.

I BEG you will accept my thanks for your letter, received on Sunday.

There is but one point on which I have been permitted to hope for the interposition of the Foreign Office in my son’s favour—that he should be brought to trial without delay. He was arrested on the 2nd April; it is now nearly June, and the trial seems as far off as ever.

If imprisonment is a punishment, it is apparently just as much the practice of the present Government of Italy, as it was of the last, to punish first and try afterwards.

For anything that appears to the contrary, my son’s case may be such another as the Count de Cristen's, who, for the last ten months, has been perpetually promised that his trial should take place “in a fortnight.”

My own natural disappointment, possibly, ought not to be thought much of; but those who have been hoping for the regeneration of Italy, on points where Civil regeneration usually begins—in its prisons and Courts of Law and Justice, will soon begin to Conclude that things are as they were—

I am, &c.

(Signed) A. BISHOP.

P.S.—I have had another letter from my son Lieutenant Bishop this morning,

He tells me that, in answer to Sir James Hudson’s application, the Procurator-General has acknowledged to him that the trial cannot come on for six or seven weeks.

The prisons are getting every day fuller, and all in them are to wait till trial by jury has been organized and learnt. It is easy to see what will be the general opinion of an institution which will be applied in the first instance to an immense accumulation of prisoners, and nine out of ten of them arrested on suspicion rather than evidence.

I beg to call your attention to the fact that, in order to justify the arrest of my son, they have now introduced into the procès against him a clerk’s case (recently arrested), who has never seen my son in his life.

The whole thing is a mockery of justice.

A. B.

___________________

No. 22.

Consul Bonham to Earl Russell.—(Received May 29.)

My Lord,                                       Naples, May 22, 1862.

I HAVE the honour to inclose copy and translation of a letter I have received from the Procuratore-Generale of the Court of Appeal, in whose charge the case of Mr. Bishop is placed, informing me that a further instruction in that case has been ordered, the duration of which is uncertain.

Were the instruction complete, however, the requisite machinery does not, in point of fact, exist for putting him on his trial. The new System of procedure in criminal cases carne nominally into operati on on the lst May, but the whole System is in an indescribable state of confusion, and nothing is done; even the jury lists are not yet made out. So far as I can understand the matter, from lawyers with whom I have spoken on the subject, Bench and Bar are equally averse to the changes; all make difficulties, and there is a passive and stubborn opposition, which has yet to be overcome. Meanwhile, the number of persons committed, and waiting for trial, amounts to many thousands, and even if the Courts could be got into working order at once, to get through this list would occupy a longer period than could, I apprehend, be tolerated; and it seems to be felt that a general amnesty for all persons charged simply with political offences, is the only way of getting out of the difficulty.

I have, &c.

(Signed) EDW. WALTER BONHAM.

____________________

Inclosure in No. 22.

Signor Tanigro to Consul Bonham.

Stimatissimo Signore,

NELL’ORA in cui favorì ella in mia casa io ne era sortito per recarmi all'uffizio. Coglierò la occasione per avere l’onore di fare la personale conoscenza di lei.

Il processo del Signor Bishop fu presentato alla Sezione di Accusa della Corte di Appello la mattina del 12 stante. Fu ordinato un prosieguo d’istruzione.

La deliberazione suddetta sarà subito eseguita; ma non sono in grado di prevedere qual altro tempo sarà necessario per compiere novella istruzione, il cui sviluppo è ignoto.

Sia certo che si farà il possibile per lo sollecito disbrigo, richiedendo ogni dovere di giustizia e di umanità.

Gradisca, &c

(Firmato) DESIATO TANIGRO.

(Translation.)

Sir,

AT the time you called at my house I had left for my office. I shall seek an occasion to have the honour of personally making your acquaintance.

The case of Mr. Bishop was presented to the Section of Accusation of the Court of Appeal on the morning of the 12th instant. A continuation of the instruction was ordered.

The above order will be forthwith carried into effect; but I am not in a position to tell what further time will be required to complete this new instruction, as the course it may take cannot be foreseen.

Be assured that every exertion will be made for a prompt decision in the matter, regard being had to every duty of justice and humanity.

Receive &c

(Signed) DESIATO TANIGRO.

No, 23.

Sir J. Hudson to Bari Russell.—(Received May 30.)

My Lord,                               Turin, May 27, 1862

I SPORE to M. Ratazzi this morning upon the subject of the trial of Mr. Bishop.

I reminded his Excellency that he gave me reason to believe that Mr. Bishop’s trial should take place not later than the second week in May, and that it now appeared that no period had been fixed for it.

M. Ratazzi declared that the Italian Government desired nothing so much as the speedy trial of Mr. Bishop, but that great difficulty had been, and still is, experienced in organizing trial by jury, and consequently all that he could promise was that every means should be used to push forward Mr. Bishop’s trial as quickly as possible.

I have, &c.

(Signed) JAMES HUDSON.

No. 24.

Mr. Hammond     to the Rev. Bishop.

Sir,                                    Foreign Office, June 3, 1862.

I AM directed by Earl Russell to inform you that Sir James Hudson reports that, in a conversation which he had recently held with M. Ratazzi he had reminded his Excellency that he had given him reason to suppose that your son’s trial should take place about the second week in May, but that apparently no period had now been fixed for it. M. Ratazzi replied that the Italian Government were most anxious that the trial should take place speedily, but that as great difficulty was experienced in organizing trial by, jury, all he could promise was that Mr. Bishop’s case should be pushed forward as quickly as possible.

I am, &c.

(Signed) E. HAMMOND.

No. 25.

Earl Russell to Sir Hudson.

Sir,                           Foreign Office, June 9, 1862.

I HAVE to instruct you to represent to Signor Ratazzi the importance of making every exertion to bring to trial the persons now confined in the prisons of the South of Italy who are accused of treason or other political crimes.

If there is great delay in constituting the Courts of Justice, and introducing trial by jury, the political prisoners may have to wait through the summer and part of the autumn in the unhealthy confinement of the Neapolitan jails.

On behalf of Mr. Bishop, Her Majesty’s Government protest against such delay; and they cannot but think that, as a case of humanity, as well as of justice, the position of large numbers of persons, said to be thousands, now under arrest, ought to be considered by Signor Ratazzi.

A speedy and fair trial of accused persons is one of the greatest improvements, and one of the happiest innovations, the Italian Government can introduce in the Neapolitan provinces.

I am, &c.

(Signed RUSSELL.

No. 26.

Consul-General Bonham to Earl Russell.—(Received June 17.)

My Lord,                              Naples, June 7, 1862.

I HAVE the honour to report to your Lordship that Monday, the 2nd of June, having been fixed for the general  opening of the Law Courts, I called on Signor Visone on that day to inquire whether the Courts for the trial of persons committed for political  offences would also be opened, and if not, at what time it was likely they would be definitively constituted. I mentioned to Signor Visone that the object of my inquiry was to be able to inform your Lordship at what time it was probable Mr. Bishop’s trial would come on. Signor Visone informed me that the jury lists had not yet been completed, but he expected to receive them in the course of a few days, and added that he would then give me the earliest possible information when the Courts would commence work. I have not since heard from. him on the subject.

I must, however, state to your Lordship that I see, at present, but a remote prospect of the Courts getting into working order. The Court of Commerce and the Civil Courts were opened, as announced, on Monday last, under the new regulations; that is, under the new law of stampa and registry, which is far more onerous in its charges than the old one. With a view of showing their dissatisfaction at the new system the gentlemen of the bar persist in taking no part in the proceedings; a few cases which had stood over for decision have been decided, but no new cases entered; and, in fact, from Monday until this day, though the Courts have been open, and the Judges present, no business has been done. How long this may continue I cannot say, but, at present, all legal  business here appears to have come to a stand-still.

I have, &c.

(Signed) EDW. WALTER BONHAM.

No. 27.

Sir J. Hudson to Earl Russell.—(Received June 17.)

My Lord,                             Turin June 14, 1862.

NOT having been able to see General Durando, I did not think it expedient to delay any longer its making the representation to the Italian Government concerning the delay in bringing Mr. Bishop to trial, contained in your Lordship’s despatch of the 9th instant.

I have therefore addressed to his Excellency a note, the copy of which I have the honour herewith to inclose.

I have, &c.

(Signed) JAMES HUDSON.

__________________

Inclosure in No. 27.

Sir J. Hudson to General Durando.

Sir,                                    Turin , June 14, 1862.

I AM instructed by Her Majesty’s Government to represent to your Excellency the importance of making every exertion to bring to trial the persons now confined in the prisons of the South of Italy, who are accused of treason and other political  crimes.

If there is great delay in constituting the Courts of Justice, and introducing trial by jury, the political prisoners may have to wait through the summer and part of the autumn in the unhealthy confinement of the Neapolitan jails.

On behalf of Mr. Bishop, Her Majesty’s Government protest against such delay, and they cannot but think that, as a case of humanity, as well as of justice, the position of large numbers of persons (said to be thousands) now under arrest, ought to be considered by the Italian Government.

A speedy and fair trial of accused persons is one of the greatest improvements, and one of the happiest innovations, the Italian Government can introduce in the Neapolitan Provinces.

I have, &c.

(Signed) JAMES HUDSON.

No. 28.

Sir J. Hudson to Earl Russell.—(Received June 25.)

My Lord,                             Turin, June 21, 1862.

WITH reference to my despatch of the 14th instant, I have the honour to inclose herewith to your Lordship copy of a note from General Durando, in answer to my communication to the Italian Government on the subject of Mr. Bishop’s trial.

I have, &c.

(Signed) JAMES HUDSON.

__________________

Inclosure in No. 28.

General Durando to Sir J. Hudson.

M. le Ministre,             Turin, le 17 Juin, 1862.

J’AI reçu la note que vous m’avez fait l’honneur de m’écrire le 14 du courant au sujet des individus qui se trouvent détenus pour cause politique dans les prisons des Provinces Méridionales du Royaume.

J’ai  eu soin de communiquer cette note à mon collègue M. le Ministre de la Justice en lui priant de vouloir bien veiller à ce que rien ne Vienne entraver la marche de la procédure judiciaire initiée contre les individus en question, et je m’empresse maintenant de vous donner l’assurance, M. le Ministre, que l’autorité judiciaire, de laquelle seule dépend maintenant le sort des détenus, accomplira scrupuleusement et avec toute le zèle possible son devoir.

Veuillez, &c.

Pour le Ministre,

(Signé) MELIGMI.

_______________

No. 29.

Earl Russell to Consul-General Bonham.

Sir,                             Foreign Office 26, 1862.

I INCLOSE herewith, for your information, extract of a letter which has been communicated by the Marquis of Normanby relative to an alleged inspection of the state of the prisons at Naples, and I have to instruct you to send home a full and immediate report on the statements in this letter.

I am, &c.

(Signed) RUSSELL.

____________________

Inclosure in No. 29.

Letter addressed to the Marquis of Normanby.

(Extract.)

THE reply made by Earl Russell last night in the House of Peers to your Lordship’s question, as to whether any report had been received from an English Commissioner sent to examine into the state of the Neapolitan prisoners, “that no British Commissioner had been sent to inspect the prisons at Naples,” obliges me to assure you of the following facts:—

Without stopping to inquire what meaning Earl Russell may possibly attach to the word “Commissioner,” and regardless as to whether any one was sent or went, went officially or unofficially, I beg to state explicitly that two Englishmen, one of whom was Mr. Russell, understood to be Mr. Odo Russell—it might be his brother Mr. Arthur Russell—were introduced into the Neapolitan prisons, in the capacity of persons charged to investigate the condition of the prisoners.

It was a praiseworthy determination, and ought not to be concealed; yet it was little short of a duty with the English Government, certain members of which seemed to score and disbelieve the enormities committed by the Piedmontese Government throughout the country. I beg to state, and I do so on undeniable and incontrovertible authority, that various prisoners, and amongst them Captain de Biasio and Lieutenant Testa, were both tortured; the former, a young Royalist officer, was arrested and accused of conspiracy, and to make him confess, pieces of sharp wood were driven under his nails. And Lieutenant Testa was beaten nearly to death with sticks, and then thrown into a well and drenched from time to time with buckets of icy-cold water. These facts were, with many others, stated to the visiting gentlemen, the Count de Cristen and Mr. Bishop being present, and the latter acted as interpreter for De Blasio. And having done so, he stated how he himself had been beaten with sticks. Having heard these details of cruelty, let it be said for these characters, as Englishmen, tliey appeared unutterably disgusted. A few weeks later the French Ambassador, M, Benedetti, went over the same scene with the same proofs and the same witnesses, when even a stronger degree of disgust and disapproval  was expressed. We know also that he communicated the particulars to his Imperial  master.

If the Government of Victor Emmanuel would clear itself from these grave charges, if they are ready to prove to the world the boasted amelioration in the administration of justice, if they have one particle of proof against those who have been lingering for ten months in dose imprisonment, why do they not bring them to fair and open trial, which has been weekly, daily, sought for by Count de Cristen, Marchese Carracciolo, and the Marchesa di Santa Barretta, and many others. Though these trials are constantly promised, they have been as often suspended, the last pretext being the necessity of waiting for the new Judges, who, though by the Constitution irremovable, have been all changed, the existing ones being considered too humane and conscientious.

I rejoiced last night to bear Earl Russell’s frank and loyal assertion applauded by the House, “That it was the opinion of Her Majesty’s Government that these trials should take place without any further delay.”

No. 30.

Earl Russell to Sir J. Hudson.

Sir,                       Foreign Office, July 1, 1862.

I HAVE received your despatch of the 21st instant, inclosing a copy of General Durando’s reply to the inquiry which you had been instructed to make to the Italian Government upon the subject of Mr. Bishop’s trial, and I have to desire you to ask for some more specific assurances than those contained in General Durando’s note. Her Majesty’s Government are anxious to learn precisely when the trial of Mr. Bishop will take place.

I am, &c.

(Signed) RUSSELL.

No. 31.

Consul-General  Bonham to Earl Russell.—(July 2.)

My Lord,              Naples, June 25,1862.

I HAVE the honour to report to your Lordship that I have been, this day, informed by Signor Visone that the jury lists «ire, at last, completed, and that he believes the Courts will open for the trial of prisoners in the first days of July. He stated that the first case for trial was one for an assassination; the next two would probably be those of De Cristin and Bishop. I shall immediately communicate with Mr. Bishop in respect,to his defence. His brother is gone to Malta.

I received a letter, some days ago, from Mr. Bishop, complaining of both his room and his person having been searched by Carabinieri; I accordingly sent Mr. George Douglas, of this Consulate, to see Mr. Bishop and the Delegato, and inquire into the circumstances. The Delegato informed Mr. Douglas that the prisoners confined in Santa Maria Apparente, not Mr. Bishop alone, were searched by Carabinieri, at uncertain periods, by order of the higher authorities; that on one occasion he (the Delegato) was not present when the search was made. He added, that as Mr. Bishop complained of being searched by Carabinieri, he would apply to the General of the Carabinieri for permission to take that duty on himself for the future: this was repeated in Mr. Bishop’s presence. He stated that Mr. Bishop had indulgences which were never before known in the prison, such as a separate room, bath, chest of drawers, &c.

The main, and just cause of complaint Mr. Bishop, in my opinion, really has, is that of delay in being brought to trial; as to his treatment in prison, I believe it to be as good as the circumstances admit of.

I can further report that business is beginning to be resumed in the Civil Courts.

I have &c.

(Signed)  EDW. WALTER BONHAM.

No. 32.

Consul-General Bonham to Earl Russell.—(Received July 8.)

My Lord,                    Naples, June 30, 1862.

I HAVE the honour to report to your Lordship that, as stated in my despatch of the 25th instant, I communicated to Mr. Bishop that his trial would probably come on in the first days of July, and that it would be well to take steps for his defence, either by engaging an Advocate, or by my requesting the Procuratore del Re to name one, ex officio, to assist him.

Mr. Douglas had a long conversation with Mr. Bishop on the subject, the result of which Mr. Douglas states to me as follows:—

“Mr. Bishop will have no Advocate, unless the Procuratore del Re compels him to have one; therefore, in order to prevent his being appointed ex officio, he would choose one himself, subject to your approval; he will, however, not allow him to make his defence, but direct him to read the defence which he has drawn up himself. He hopes to be tried in Consiglio di Camera, and not in public; and also to be informed, in time, whether he has to choose an Advocate at all.”

I saw Signor Visone again this morning; he could not teli me anything positive about the day of trial, and I fear there will be some further delay in respect to it.

I have, &c.

(Signed) EDW. WALTER BONHAM.

No. 33.

Sir J. Hudson to Earl Russell.—(Received July 8.)

My Lord,                  Turin, July 4, 1862.

I HAVE the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your Lordship’s despatch of the lst instant, respecting Mr. Bishop’s trial, and I have the honour to inclose, herewith, copy and translation of a letter which the Minister of Grace and Justice has addressed to General Durando on this subject.'

I have, &c.

(Signed) JAMES HUDSON.

________________

Inclosure in No. 33.

The Minister of Grace and Justice to General

Torino, 25 Giugno, 1862.

IL Sottoscritto si pregia di partecipare all’ onorevole suo collega il Ministero degli Esteri, essere testé giunto a questo Ministero un dispaccio nel quale il Procuratore-Generale presso la Corte d’Appello di Napoli partecipa che le Assisie saranno aperti il 5 ovvero il 6 entrante mese di Luglio, e che il processo di Cristen. sul quale era già emanata la decisione della Sezione d’Accusa, sarebbe stato probabilmente trattato il giorno 10 detto mese.

Il processo Bishop è ancora in corso d’istruzione, ma l’autorità giudiziaria farà quanto è da lei affinché sia il più sollecitamente possibile portato a compimento.

Per il Ministro,

(Firmato)BARBAROUX.

________________

(Translation.)

Turin, June 25, 1862.

THE Undersigned has the honour to inform his colleague the Minister for Foreign Affairs that he has just received a despatch from the Procureur-General of the Court of Appeal of Naples, informing him that the Assizes will open the 5th or 6th of July, and that the trial of Cristen will probably come on on the 10th of that month, the “Sezione d’Accusa ” having already pronounced their decision.

The case of Bishop is not yet completed, but the judicial authorities will do all in their power to bring it to a dose as speedily as possible.

For the Minister,

(Signed) BARBAROUX.

No. 34.

Sir J. Hudson to Earl Russell.—(Received July 8.)

My Lord,              Turin, July 4, 1862.

I SPOKE to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and to the Minister of Justice, this morning, upon the subject of Mr. Bishop’s trial. Both those gentlemen assured me that the strictest orders had been given that no unnecessary delay should be permitted to take place with regard to the period of his trial.

M. de Cristen’s trial would be the first, as he had been the longest confined; Mr. Bishop’s would, they hoped, be the second. The Procureur du Roi was using his best endeavours to conclude the indictment, and it would have been already completed, had it not been found necessary to take additional evidence with regard to a person suspected of being an accomplice with Mr. Bishop.

They hoped that during the week, or, at latest, the week after next, Mr. Bishop’s trial __ would take place.

I have, &c.

(Signed) JAMES HUDSON.

No. 35.

Consul General Bonham to Earl Russell.—(Received July 11.)

(Extract.)                      Naples, July 3, 1862.

WITH reference to my despatch of the 30th June, in which I expressed some apprehension that there would be further delay in respect to Mr. Bishop’s trial, I have the honour to report to your Lordship that, after several futile attempts, I, last night, saw Signor Tanigro, Procuratore del Re, in whose particular charge Mr. Bishop’s case is, for the purpose of ascertaining positively the day of trial.

M. Tanigro commenced by telling me that the trial could not ccrtainly tabe place this month, and he was by no means sure it would take place in August. He stated the instruction was still going on, and he could not teli when the report of the Judge would be received.

We had a very long and very warm discussion on the subject, for I pressed him as hard as I could to induce him to have the trial brought on, representing the scandal it was, in the sight of Europe, to have people kept on for months in this wav, in prison, without trial.

He attributed all to the form of procedure required by the laws, from which he could not deviate.

He at length admitted it might, perhaps, be possible that Mr. Bishop’s trial would come on next after Count de Cristen’s. The Courts would open on the 7th; De Cristen’s would not be the first case, and, when it did come on, it would probably occupy twelve or fifteen days, as there were depositions of 200 witnesses; but he would give me no assurance to this effect.

I remarked that, if one trial took fifteen days, it would be long before the prisons were cleared.

He said he regretted it was so, for there were upwards of 1,000 people waiting for trial.

I said I believed 20,000 was nearer the mark.

He said, there may be from 12,000 to 15,000 in these provinces.

I finally told him that, as, according to the System of instruction pursued, it appeared impossible to define any period whatever when the trial would positively come on, I supposed he intended me to write to your Lordship to that effect.

He begged me not to do so, saying he would inquire very particularly into the case to-morrow (this) morning, and write me the result.

As I, of course, should greatly prefer having some written communication from him, I told him I would wait a day for his letter, which I shall accordingly do, and trust I may receive it in time to accompany this despatch.

My impression is, the Government do what they can to get the trials forward, but there is a power of passive opposition on the part of the Judicial Body which they cannot overcome; and I still believe that a general  amnesty, for, at least, political  prisoners, will ultimately be found a matter of necessity; indeed, one may infer, from the entire want of success which has hitherto attended the endeavours of M. de Soulanges, French Consul General, and myself, supported by our respective Envoys, and-aided, as I believe, by the Italian Government, to get forward the trial of the Count de Cristen and Mr. Bishop, what a small chance there is for those who have no one to bring their names forward.

As respects Signor Tanigro’s remark that Signor Visone knew nothing at all about the matter, I must state that he (Visone) acts under General La Marmora as Prefect in matters relating to the Civil Administration of Naples, and is the person with whom I, consequently, communicate on such matters; and, were it not that there is an utter absence of good understanding between the Administrative and Judicial Departments, he is just the person that ought to have information about these trials.

I have received this evening the promised letter from Signor Tanigro, which I inclose in original, together with a translation; it is more favourable than I anticipated.

_________________

Inclosure in No. 35.

Signor Tanigro to Consul-General Bonham.

Illustrissimo Signore,            Napoli, 3 Luglio, 1862.

SECONDO jeri lo promissi, ho preso conto del processo a carico del Signor Bishop. Il Giudice Istruttore mi fa sperare che tra oggi o dimane lo farà arrivare a questo uffizio. Appena giungerà lo proporrò alla Sezione di Accusa.

Ritenga V.S. che per parte mia e de’ miei colleghi si farà il possibile perchè la giustizia si faccia, e subito.

Gradisca, &c.

(Firmato) DESIATO TANIGRO.

(Translation.)

Sir,                                           Naples, July 3, 1862.

IN accordance with what I promised you yesterday I have made inquiry respecting the case against Mr. Bishop. The Judge Instructor lends me to hope that to-day or to-morrow he will send it into this office. Immediately it is received 1 will submit it to the Section of Accusation.

You may rely that on my part, and that of my colleagues, everything possible will be done that justice may be had, and quickly.

Believe me, &c.

(Signed) DESIATO TANIGRO.

No. 36.

Consul-General Bonham to Earl Russell.—(Received July 17.)

My Lord,                            Naples, July 5, 1862.

I HAVE the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your Lordship’s despatch of 26th June, inclosing copy of a letter communicated to your Lordship by the Marquis of Normanby, and directing me to send home a full and immediate report on the statements contained in that letter.

I have to state that I have no knowledge of any persons having been introduced into the Neapolitan prisons in the capacity of Commissioners, to investigate the condition of the prisoners. As to either Mr. Odo Russell or Mr. Arthur Russell having been one of the persons so introduced, I can only say I am not aware that either of those gentlemen has been in Naples since the beginning of April; the alleged investigations must have been subsequent to that date, as Mr. Bishop, who, it is stated, acted as interpreter, was arrested and committed to the prison of Santa Maria about the 7th of that month.

I remember General La Marmora mentioned to me, some weeks ago, that an English gentleman, a Mr. Borthwick, had visited the prison of Santa Maria Apparente, and had, subsequently, called on him and told him how very well it was conducted; and the General asked me if I knew Mr. Borthwick, to which I replied in the negative, for I never saw him. The General spoke of Mr. Borthwick as a traveller, who, from motives of curiosity, had visited Santa Maria Apparente, but said nothing that led me to infer, or suppose, that that gentleman was charged with any commission to make an investigation.

M. Benedetti did visit the prison of Santa Maria Apparente; what his impressions about it may have been, I have no means of knowing.

With the view of ascertaining, however, positively, the truth or the reverse of the alleged tortures, I applied, yesterday, to M. Visone, for permission to visit the prison of Santa Maria Apparente, in company with two other Englishmen, and to examine it as minutely as we wished. This he at once assented to, and I accordingly went there to-day, accompanied by Captain Chads, R.N., of Her Majesty’s ship “London,” now anchored in this bay, and another gentleman. We went first to Mr. Bishop’s room, where we remained considerably more than an hour, conversing with him, first, as to his own case, and subsequently about M. de Blasio and M. Testa. Mr. Bishop, distinctly and unhesitatingly, denied having been beaten with sticks, or ill-treated in any way, beyond having been three times searched during the time he has been there; be stated it was not true that M. de Biasio had been tortured by having pieces of wood forced under his nails; but it was true he had been beaten with sticks at the Vicaria (another Neapolitan prison). As to M. Testa, he knew little about him; had heard nothing about his being put into a well, but he had been beaten, as everybody was beaten, at the Vicaria. He affirmed and repeated that no ill-treatment was practised upon the prisoners confined at Santa Maria Apparente.

We then asked to see M. de Blasio himself; and Mr. Bishop went out, and very shortly returned with him, and with another gentleman who introduced himself to us also as a prisoner and a general  officer formerly in the Service of Francesco II. We asked M. de Blasio as to his having been tortured. He said there was no truth in that; but when first arrested and taken to the Vicaria, one of the keepers and a number of Camoristi who were there set upon him with their sticks, and beat him cruelly about the back and shoulders till he was black and blue. We asked what he supposed was the cause of their thus hearing him. He said, because he was a Borbonico, and they do not care what they do to a Borbonico. We asked if, after that, he had been ever again beaten, or otherwise tortured or ill-treated, to make him confess anything. He replied, No, but always brutally treated; the keepers at the Vicaria are all brutes, and in league with the Camoristi.

He then related to us the particulars of his case, as did also General d’Ambrosio (or de Blasio) the details of his case at very great length, dwelling on the trivial and totally insufficient causes for which they had been severally, especially the latter, arrested, and the utter illegality of the proceedings adopted against them; to which, of course, we could say nothing, they being matters only to be cleared up by a trial. They both concurred in stating that they had nothing to complain of as to their treatment at Santa Maria Apparente, but repeated that their detention there at all was utterly illegal; and certainly the Generali case appeared a very hard one. He, the General, stated that he had served much, had the decoration of the Legion of Honour, and many other decorations; that he had stated his whole case to M. Benedetti, and hoped he would report it to the Emperor.

We then left Mr. Bishop’s room, and, passing a few doors down the corridor, went into the room in which was Count de Cristen and a Danish gentleman. I congratulated Count de Cristen, whom I had not seen since the day of his arrest, on the 7th September last, on the prospect, at last, approaching of a termination to his imprisonment, as his trial is now fixed for the 17th of this month. I asked him about the treatment of himself and others. He said, “There is nothing to complain of here. As to De Blasio and Testa, they were both beaten (bàtonnés) at the Vicaria. The keepers there are brutes. Here we are well treated.”

After some further conversation we went on some little way down the corridor, looking at numerous rooms, and then left the prison.

Every facility was given to us to see and examine as much as we wished. The Delegato, who was with us, had each room opened as we walked down the corridor, told us who the persons were in each room, and then drew back some steps, so that we could enter and converse with any of the prisoners we chose, without any one either seeing or hearing what passed.

We carne away with the entire conviction that there is no truth in the assertion that torture has been inflicted in any case, but also with the full belief that the prison of the Vicaria has brutal keepers and is badly conducted; in fact, that it maintains some of its old traditions of brutality. It was formerly, I believe, the very worst prison in Naples, and it is extremely probable that some of the old jailers still remain, and follow, to some extent, the old system. I hope to have an opportunity ere long of visiting the Vicaria; but I see no reason to defer replying to your Lordship’s despatch until I do so, as torture to extort confession, and brutality in jailers, are very different things, and the first certainly does not exist.

As to the trials, they commence on Monday the 7th instant, and it is most lamentable that they did not commence months ago.

I will only further remark that I utterly disbelieve the assertion that any judges were changed, because considered too humane and conscientious; the misfortune has been that the changes were not made much more complete, and that some northern Italiana were not introduced into the judicial body at Naples, whose energy and decision might have succeeded in forcing forward the preliminary arrangements, and getting the newly established Courts for trial by jury into working order at an earlier period.

I have &c

(Signed) EDW. WALTER BONHAM.

No. 37.

Consul General Bonham to Earl Russell.—(Received July 17.)

My Lord,               Naples, July 9, 1862.

I HAVE the honour to transmit to your Lordship, herewith inclosed, copy and translation of a letter I received last night from Signor Tanigro, Procuratore del Re, informing me that the “Sezione di Accusa,” which appears in some measure to execute the functions of a Grand Jury, has sent the case of Mr. Bishop to the Court of Assizes. I hope very shortly to learn what day has been fixed for the trial.

I have, &c.

(Signed) EDW. WALTER BONHAM.

_______________

Inclosure in No. 37.

Signor Tanigro to Consul Bonham.

Signore,                                Napoli, 8 Luglio, 1862.

HO in pregio di farle sapere, di avere la Sezione di Accusa rinviato il Signor Bishop alla Corte di Assisse, con deliberazione di jeri.

Per quanto è in mio potere, si stanno spingendo gli atti ordinati dal Codice di Procedura Penale, onde si acceleri il dibattimento.

Sarà mia cura di indicarle il giorno in cui potrà seguire.

Mi creda, &c.

(Firmato) TANIGRO.

(Translation.)

Sir,                                        Naples, July 8, 1862.

I HAVE the honour to inform you that the Section of Accusation, by deliberation dated yesterday, has sent Mr. Bishop before the Court of Assizes.

As far as it is in my power, the documents required by the Code for Penal  Precedure are being hurried forward, in order to bring on an early discussion.

It shall be my care to inform you of the day the case will come on.

Believe me, &c.

(Signed) TANIGRO.

_______________

No. 38.

Sir J. Hudson to Earl Russell.—(Received July 19.)

My Lord,                                                  Naples, July 15,1862.

GENERAL DURANDO informs me that he has received a telegram dated Naples this day, to the following effect:—

“Tomorrow, the 16th, Bishop will be interrogated by the President of the Court of t Assizes.

“The usual  term for process being expired, his case will come on, and will be entered for trial on the 31st of this month.”

I HAVE &c

(Signed) JAMES HUDSON.

No. 39.

Consul-General Bonham to Earl Russell.—(Received July 24.)

My Lord,                               Naples, July 19, 1862.

I HAVE the honour to report to your Lordship that the day fixed for the trial of Mr. Bishop is the 31st of this month. In making to me this communication, dated the 18th instant, Signor Tanigro adds:—

“But, yesterday, Mr. Bishop addressed a lettèr to the President of the Court of Assizes, in which he begged him not to attach any importance to the mention he had made of the name of the Advocate Marini Serra, as he, Bishop, could not decide upon the choice of an Advocate. This would imply that, until Bishop had decided as to the choice of an Advocate, the cause should not come on. But it is the duty of the President of the Court of Assizes to appoint an Advocate for him ex officio, and he will do so immediately; so that if the person to be tried does not throw any other obstacle in the way, the trial will take place on the day fixed.”

I received two lettere from Mr. Bishop on the 17th, copies of which I inclose. I answered the first, and Mr. Douglas, of this office, called at Santa Maria Apparente, and had a long conversation on the subject of them with Mr. Bishop yesterday morning. He describes Mr. Bishop as being in a state of painful excitement and agitation owing to the arrest of this Mr. Schmid, whom he speaks of as the only friend he has in Naples, and he stated that, in consequence, he had interrupted all steps to be taken for his defence.

As to obtaining Mr. Schmid’s release, as he expects, it is what I cannot, of course ask; but the Questor of Police has sent me word that he will allow the two to communicate freely, and consign to me, in the course of the day, all the property which may tum out to belong to Mr. Bishop, and which was left in Schmid’s charge. Schmid has been arrested, together with three other persons, either Swiss or Germans, all, I believe, formerly belonging to Swiss regiments in Neapolitan 'Service, on suspicion of being engaged in a plot to carry off, for ransom, M. Oscar Meuricoffre, Swiss Consul-General, who is also a wealthy banker in this city.

I shall immediately communicate further with Mr. Bishop, and a6k him to take efficient steps for his defence by engaging the Services of Marini Serra, whose name he mentioned with great eulogy when Captain Chads and I visited him on the 5th instant, but I apprehend he will be but little disposed to listen to any advice or suggestion coming from me.

I have, &c.

(Signed) EDW. WALTER BONHAM.

_______________

Inclosure 1 in No. 39.

Mr. J. Bishop to Consul-General Bonham.

Sir,                                  Santa Maria Apparente, July 17, 1862.

I AM informed by the Delegato of the prison that my friend, Mr. Schmid, has been arrested by the police, and that he is still detained at the Questura.. I can learn nothing more than this. I entreat you to do me the favour of taking some steps in the matter, either to obtain his release, or gain for me some information about him. As you are, perhaps, aware, Mr. Schmid is the only friend I have in Naples, and depending asT must do upon his assistance, I am now left without means or help of any kind whatever. Mr. Schmid has all my effects, as well as my money, in his care; and it is of the greatest importance for me to be able to communicate with him on the point. This has been refused by the Secretary-General, and I am consequently in great anxiety. It is incredible that, knowing as the Secretary-General does, from his intimacy with Mr. Schmid, how entirely I depended upon his assistance, even to supplying my daily wants, that, added to the arrest of his person, he should refuse to allow me to communicate with him. You will not, I feel sure, fail to let me know, as soon as possible, the result of your inquiries. This is tlie second time during my imprisonment that my frigad has been arrested; and, as the malice of the police knows no bounds, I must suppose this to be practised to add another trial to all I suffer. The first time was when Mr. Schmid went to my lodging to take my effects in charge, and insisting upon the restitution of a large part of them which had been stolen; he was arrested by the Carabiniers, and for what had been stolen I have not been able to obtain satisfaction. Perhaps you may be able to do me the favour of having the accompanying lines passed to my friend.

I am, &c.

(Signed) J. BISHOP.

________________

Inclosure 2 in No. 39.

Mr. J. Bishop to Consul-General Bonham.

Sir,                        Santa Maria Apparente July 17, 1862.

I BEG to acknowledge the receipt of your answer to my letter, entreating your interference in Mr. Schmid’s case, as regards my entire dependence on his assistance, and I shall be in great anxiety and trouble till something can be arranged on the point.

As regards my being able to communicate with Mr. Schmid, I think I mentioned that the Delegato had refused to allow me to do so; a most barbarous and unjust abuse, as both this officer, as well as the Secretary-General, are quite aware how entirely I am dependent on Mr. Schmid. It was owing to this that I had troubled you with a note for him.

You are aware that my brother is not at Naples, and that I have not any one to act for me relative to my trial. Id consequence of Mr. Schmid’s arrest, and my not being allowed to communicate with him, I have been obliged to interrupt any steps that were necessary to take for my defence.

I hope that you will be in a position to send me some favourable account when Mr. Douglas is good enougli to come to me.

I am, &c.

(Signed) J. BISHOP.

No. 40.

Sir J. Hudson to Earl Russell.

Turin, July 30, 1862.

THE Minister of Justice has informed me that Mr. Bishop’s trial is deferred, at his own request, for twenty days from the 26th instant.

No. 41.

Sir J. Hudson to Earl Russell.—(Received August 2.)

My Lord,                                   Turin July 30, 1862.

I HAVE the honour to inclose herewith to your Lordship the copy of a communication which I have received from the Minister of Grace and Justice, informing me that Mr. Bishop’s trial has been deferred, at his own request, for twenty days from the 26th instant.

I have, &c.

(Signed) JAMES HUDSON.

____________________

Inclosure 1 in No. 41.

Signor Barbaroux to Sir J. Hudson.

Excellence,                                Turin, le 29 Juillet 1862.

JE m’empresse de communiquer à votre Excellence copie d’une dépêche que j’ai  reçu hier de Naples relative au procès Bishop.

Votre Excellence verra que le nouveau retard dépend cette fois de la volonté de Bishop lui-même, à laquelle le Président de la Cour a cru à propos de faire droit, afin de laisser à la défense tout le teins qu’elle croyait nécessaire.

Agréez, &c.

(Signed) BARBAROUX.

_________________

Inclosure 2 in No. 41.

Signor Tanigro to the Minister of Grace and Justice.

Napoli, 28 Luglio, 1862.

BISHOP a 26 andante ha chiesto Presidente Assise diferirsi sua causa per venti giorni. Annuito. Quindi detta causa non trattasi più 31 corrente mese. Per intelligenza.

Il Procuratore-Generale del Re,

(Firmato) TANIGRO.

(Translation.)

Naples, July 28, 1862.

BISHOP on the 26th instant requested the President of Assizes to put off his trial for twenty days. Conceded. Therefore the trial will not come on, on the 31st instant. For information.

The Procurator-General of the King,

(Signed) TANIGRO.

































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